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DIY Fashion

an everyday floral brooch DIY…

Floral Brooch DIY

Floral Brooch DIY

Floral Brooch DIY

I loved it when back in the day, dapper gentlemen would wear a flower on their lapel on any given day. Brooches are always a fun fashion accessory for me, so why not combine two of my favorite things together into a floral brooch? With a small vessel for water, it can be worn for both a special occasion or really for any day you just feel like bringing a little sprig of sunshine wherever you go. It’s extra fun when you can pull the flowers from your own garden too!

Floral Brooch DIY

When planting my garden, I mix in Miracle-Gro Garden Soil for Flowers & Vegetables to improve my existing soil and get the flowers off to a great start. You can snip flowers from your garden based on what’s currently blooming. 

Floral Brooch DIY

You’ll need:

-½ in wide straws

-gold duct tape

-E6000 Glue or super glue

-brooch backing pins

Here’s how:

1. Cut straw to about 1 inch. To secure the bottom end, cut into a triangle (see image above) then fold the triangle flap to one side making sure it’s secure enough and folded high enough so that there are no openings.

2. Tape securely with duct tape. Then wrap the entire straw with duct tape covering the entire straw base.

3. Glue the brooch pin onto the back. If using E6000 glue let dry overnight.

4. Once dry, add water and flowers of your choice.

Floral Brooch DIY

Because you’re giving the flowers a little vessel of water to sit in, they’ll last a whole day at least without fading. You can also keep them cool in the fridge the night before you’re ready to give them or wear them!

Floral Brooch DIY

*This post is brought to you in collaboration with Miracle-Gro. All content, ideas, and words are my own. Thanks for supporting the sponsors that allow me to create new and special content like this for Oh Joy.

{Creative Direction by Joy Cho, photos by Casey Brodley, and crafts and styling by Julia Wester for Oh Joy}

16 comments

  1. Where is that beautiful initial necklace (in the first photo) from? I have been looking for something just like that!

  2. Hi Joy –
    I want to say that it’s very disappointing to see your continued support of Miracle Grow. As several of your other readers have pointed out they are owned and operated by Scotts who produce round up and also support Monsanto. Scotts has been found on numerous occasions of mislabeling products which contain carcinogens.
    http://www.organicagardensupply.com/why-we-dont-sell-miracle-gro/
    Monsanto is of course a monster in my opinion in the agriculture world. They actively fight against GMO labeling, seed saving and other practices which help to keep our environment, our food and ultimately us happy and healthy.
    I understand your need as a business owner to partner with companies and your desire to promote gardening but there are many other choices which are so much better for our environment and our children.

  3. I love the idea ; )
    I’t’s a perfect DIY for my best friend’s bridal shower in October.
    I’m going to suggest all of us to wear this at the party!

  4. Just want to echo MFree’s excellent comment about this sponsorship choice. I understand you need sponsors to support your business, but I think it is ethically dubious to promote chemical fertilizers, as well as a company with known ties to Monsanto, which is contributing to the degradation of global economies and environments. I know you – and many other bloggers – advertise for clothing and other products whose origins we are probably blissfully unaware. How much were the workers paid to produce this overpriced kitsch? What harmful chemicals were used to produce this cheap fashion? While blissful ignorance isn’t good, knowingly advertising for a company contributing to the degradation of our environment is pretty low.
    I think it’s important to ask, what are the social, environmental, and economic impacts of the consumer choices we make? You have a kid, so you’ll understand we have a responsibility to make better choices for them to inherit a more just and sustainable world. So, your choice to advertise for a multinational chemical company just to make a few cheap bucks may benefit you personally, but you should do yourself some favors and educate yourself about Scott, RoundUp, and Monsanto, and please think about the true value of your “special content.”
    Why would I -or anyone? -read an advertisement masked as a blog for a company I find objectionable? I really would recommend some self-reflection about choosing to advertise for this multinational corporation.

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