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Diverse Kids Books – Part 4

Here’s a new batch of books for our on-going series of diverse kids’ books…

Here’s a new batch of books for our on-going series that I wanted to share with you!

  1. Generation Brave by Kate Alexander; Illustraed by Jade Orlando – An inspiring book of Generation Z kids making brave stances and bold steps to make the world a better place. This makes for a great chapter book for an advanced reader with fun graphics and sections to start conversations with your tween or teen.
  2. A Life Made by Hand: The Story of Ruth Asawa by Andrea D’Aquino – Using amazing collages to illustrate, D’Aquino tells the story of Japanese American artist, Ruth Asawa. Asawa created brilliant woven works (now featured in international museums) with her hands. D’Aquino seems to encourage us to do the same – and even includes a fun DIY dragonfly fold at the book’s end to try!
  3. What’s Cooking at 10 Garden Street by Felicita Sala – In every apartment in 10 Garden Street, different delicious recipes are being prepared by people from all different cultures. Sala shares the recipe of how each dish is made, and then everyone comes together for a delicious feast at the end. Get ready to be hungry – the illustrations are amazing and you’ll want to try a recipe – or two!
  4. I Love Boba by Katrina Liu; Illustrated by Dhidit Prayoga – You know this one has to be one of my favorites! The book explains where my favorite drink came from, what it is, and the many ways you can make it. The cute illustrations and a fun rhyming scheme make this a fun read for boba lovers big and small.
  5. Watercress by Andrea Wang; Pictures by Jason Chin – This was a deeply emotional book for me that I could relate to so much as an Asian-American kid growing up in an American world. It tells the story of a family’s heritage and the evolution of being proud of (instead of embarrassed by) your family’s story. The book reminds us all how important it is to share our stories—even the hard ones—with our children and how our differences make us special.

See Part 1, 2, and 3!

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